New Towers to take over Downtown Brooklyn

Junior's, Downtown Brooklyn

One of New York City’s largest central business districts, Downtown Brooklyn, is on the rise, literally and figuratively. Known mainly as a commercial region, this area has been going through some major transformations over the past ten years. Some of the most noticeable changes include the addition of many residential high-rises. According to the Brooklyn Daily, director of real estate and planning in Downtown Brooklyn, Alan Washington states, “The fabric of a great urban environment is when people get to live, work, and play in the same area.” The goal of these transformations is to build more residential developments, along with creating some of the tallest and largest buildings Brooklyn has yet to see.

So far, around 33 new apartment buildings have been built in Downtown Brooklyn, with 5,251 apartments. There are 11 under construction and another 16 in development, expected to have 12,500 units. Each of these new buildings are anticipated to be larger and fancier than the last. With all these new developments, we may see Brooklyn’s tallest buildings continue to be towered over by.

Built in 1927, the Williamsburg Savings Bank Tower stood as the tallest building in Brooklyn at 512 feet tall, until The Brooklyner took over its title at 515 feet tall in 2010. Currently, 388 Bridge Street holds the title standing at 590 feet tall, but it is quite possible that title will not last long. Discussion of a new building is in the works, rumored to stand at 1,000 feet tall, and to take the place of Brooklyn’s iconic restaurant, Junior’s.

Located at at the corner of Flatbush Avenue Extension and Dekalb Avenue, stands Junior’s Restaurant, serving its famous cheesecake since 1950. Despite its popularity and success throughout the years, the owner is looking to sell the building to a developer, who plans to build a tower in its place. According to the New York Times, third-generation owner of Junior’s, Alan Rosen, originally stated that the development plan would have to allow the restaurant a space on the ground floor of the new building. Recently, however, Rosen stated that he would consider moving the location of the restaurant entirely if the price were high enough. Whether or not Junior’s will remain in its original location, the essence of Brooklyn is changing, and these transformations are inevitable. Brooklyn will most likely be seeing the creation of a thousand-foot tall tower sometime in its future.

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